Archives for posts with tag: drawing

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From Here and There

Three of my ‘Luddite’ series drawings have been selected for the group exhibition From Here & There: Drawings from Colorado & Wales.

The exhibition, curated by Jonathan Powell, director of the Elysium Gallery (Swansea) will open first at the Clara Hatton Gallery (Colorado State University) from 26 September to 26 October 2014. The exhibiton will then travel to Wales for From Here & There: Drawings from the UK at the elysiumoffsite venue ‘The Old Iceland Building’ in Swansea.

The preview is on Friday 28 November and the show continues until 20 December.

The three A2 drawings exist only as Giclée prints (oh the irony). They explores ideas around drawing, work, craft, repetition, copying and the presence and performance of the body in the drawing process.

In making the drawings I set myself rules that I deliberately could not meet. I devised a game that pitched the production of the drawing against factors like tiredness, concentration, measurement and correctness. My methodology was guided by Marina Warner’s writing about play and the haptic qualities of making and experiential learning, and David Pye’s theory of  ‘the workmanship of risk and the workmanship of certainty.’

The drawings look like textiles and in a way represent weaving and not weaving. They look like they may be an image of plain weave, but the drawn lines are not actually interlaced and therefore only have the appearance of warp and weft superimposition. The play with production and copying and the removal of the (drawing) hand is further tested by the last iteration of the drawings in their final form as digitally produced Giclée prints.

From Here & There: Drawings from Colorado & Wales
From Here & There: Drawings from the UK

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Rebirth: light and sound show at Strutt’s North Mill Belper

So the event on Saturday 29 March went well. Sarah (mill manager) and Ruth (engagement officer) reckoned we had about 120 visitors for the show.

While Stuart set up the laptops I measured and cut out film to stick to the windowpanes of the six windows, each window had six panes, so we had to measure, cut and stick 36 sheets. Meanwhile Stuart discovered that the laptops went to sleep after five minutes and we didn’t have administrator rights to cancel the sleep mode.

Still it all worked well. We staggered the startup of each laptop by the time it physically took to get each one going. So a relaxed synchronisation and a kind off delayed playback coupled with running or crawling (in my case) to each laptop to tap its trackpad to ward off sleep. Not live but certainly performative animation happened behind the scenes and largely out of view of the audience.

We are reworking the animation and sequencing for the North Mill’s ‘Museums at Night’ event on May 15. We will project the animation onto eight of the 26 monumental stone piers – all that is left of Jedediah Strutt’s first mill (1786) that burnt down in 1803 – that form the foundation of the ‘new’ mill built in 1804.

More information about Culture24’s national Museums at Night festival here and Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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Strutt’s North Mill Belper

We want to reference some of the elemental forces that helped shape the mill including fire, water and iron. Strutt’s North Mill was built in 1804 and is one of the oldest surviving examples of an industrialised, iron framed ‘fire proof’ building. The first mill burnt down.

I’ve used mono prints made during the printing of the first card template (below). I was thinking of iron being cast and the firey furnace and also some of the fantastic footage used in ‘The Big Melt – How Steel Made Us Hard‘ (Martin Wallace and Jarvis Cocker).

This will form part of a larger work made with Stuart Poynton and Marc Bosward (sound). It will be projected onto the windows of Strutt’s North Mill Belper this weekend (7pm on Saturday 29 March).

Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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More animation for Strutt’s North Mill Belper

I’m making very short animation sequences using a convoluted, complex (relatively) slow process.

Method
The gif (top) is the result of drawing the animation in Illustrator, then laser cutting the individual frames from corrugated card, followed by relief printing the frame matrix with black ink onto 40gsm newsprint. When the ink is dry the sheet is cut into individual frames that are then scanned and photoshoped before assembly and timing in AfterEffects.

The process needs refining. I like the finished result but it’s a bit too ordered or regular. I was hoping for more of the unexpected and that the various format changes and translations would add a greater range of ‘mistakes’ or random events into the workflow.

As I make these sequences I’m thinking about slow animation that is beyond the control of the animator and that through an engagement with a range of machine processes (both analogue and digital) I can attempt to foreground both animation’s craft legacy and its constructed nature. A project to make animation visible again.

Maybe animation is sited in the frame after all and not in the gap between frames?

My sequences will form part of a larger work made with Stuart Poynton and Marc Bosward (sound). It will be projected onto the windows of Strutt’s North Mill Belper this weekend (7pm on Saturday 29 March).

Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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Sample images and treatments for ‘Rebirth’ a light and sound projection made with Stuart Poynton and Marc Bosward. A looped animation made from a patchwork of short animation sequences will be projected onto the windows of the first floor and basement of Strutt’s North Mill Belper as part of the celebrations to mark the museum’s Summer Opening event.

The animation will be projected from inside the museum onto six windows that will be covered with a translucent film. A lot of animation to make and stitch together before the event on Saturday 29 March 2014 (7pm).

Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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Installing ‘Full Employment in a Free Society (1944)’ on last Sunday afternoon in the basement of Strutt’s North Mill Belper.

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The Belper Art Trail 2013 is on from Monday 8 to Sunday 21 July at venues across Belper and more information about the trail and a trail guide, which lists the 17 artists and the venues for their work, is available from Corridor Arts.

Andrew Martyn Sugars (Corridor Arts) who has curated the trail and Sarah Skinner, the Mill manager, were interviewed in last week’s Belper News (3/7/13) about the Art Trail and my imminent arrival! In the article Sarah said, ‘The Strutt Mill complex harnessed the power of the Derwent to produce cotton thread that wound its way across the world so Tim Shore’s work is really appropriate here, referencing as it does weaving, workforce and mechanisation as well as commenting on the austere times we live in today.’

Here’s a link to Strutt’s North Mill Belper and the Belper News article.

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CASTLE / SHED / CHAIN

First test for a larger sculptural weave project, although at the moment there is no weave in it just one continuous piece of weft yarn.

The title is made up of three technical terms from handloom weaving: castle / shed / chain. The castle sits on top of the loom’s shafts and organises the warp thread, the shed is the space created between the upper and lower warp threads and a chain describes how the warp threads are organised in preparation for threading on to a loom. Castle / shed / chain also suggests a hierarchy and metaphor for the organisation, mechanisation and regulation of the early textile mills.

I’ve made a small test model that is sized to fit into my sketchbook. The landscape A4 card folds out to a 90º angle and in doing so pulls the yarn taut. The yarn is held in tension as long as sufficient pressure is applied. I’ve used corrugated card that is too thin and is easily pulled out of shape and I didn’t use a long enough piece of yarn and therefore you can see a knot in one of the photographs. Despite these problems I’m pleased with this first test and will make a second larger version. This project leads on from the preparatory sketch posted under ‘Drawing’ (January 20, 2013).

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Too much night, again. Pae White, South London Gallery
13 March to 12 May 2013

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Visited the South London Gallery yesterday to see Pae White’s installation ‘Too much night, again’.

The exhibition guide says it is about insomnia and the ‘transience of our existence’. Thousands of lines of coloured yarn spell out the ‘words’: TIGER TIME and UNMATTERING, apparently random words at a ‘super graphic’ size that carry the weight of an unknown dream significance. I don’t think unmattering is a word, but that doesn’t matter I suppose. Originally Tiger Time was going to be  Tiger Tiger until someone pointed out that Tiger Tiger is a UK bar chain. However Tiger Tiger also recalls William Blake’s poem The Tyger, which begins: Tyger!, Tyger!, burning bright / In the forests of the night, / What immortal hand or eye / Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

Through an intricate construction of mapping, criss-crossing and iteration letters are revealed and words are built and the yarn pools at the stress points of the letterforms. But it isn’t one continuous thread. Each length of yarn is tied off at both ends to either a letterfom point or a ‘control’ line facing the letterform. This is understandable but a bit disappointing as the work as a whole is not under tension, it just appears to be. Conrad Shawcross had the same problem with Chord, a ropemaking installation in the Kingsway Tram tunnel in Holborn, London (2009). Two machines spun strands of string into a thick ‘hawser’. There was insufficient tension, or rather tension was not sustained as the work progressed and props were needed.

What I think is really successful about ‘Too much night, again’ is the work’s powerful physical presence, the installation’s material and spatial qualities are striking. When you first enter the gallery and walk instinctively beneath the apex of the crossing threads it is very easy to walk right into the fragile looking yarn because the multiple and densely interlaced lines create a disorientating layered ‘fog’ effect where it is impossible to judge what is near or far. The exhibition guide says you have to position yourself within the installation to read the lettering and I found that I couldn’t read until I had measured myself against the yarn itself.

Went to the Oskar Fischinger exhibition at EYE, Amsterdam a couple of weeks ago. EYE Film Institute Netherlands opened in 2012, it is another example of wonky iconic architecture (think gherkin, cheesegrater, walkie-talkie, shard) and it’s a very short ferry ride from the central station, across the IJ to Amsterdam-Noord.

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The exhibition – Oskar Fischinger 1900 – 1967: Experiments in Cinematic Abstraction – is organised by EYE Filmmuseum and Center for Visual Music and surveys Fischinger’s work and career in Europe and America. The animation work is really well installed with large screens in properly dark rooms, sound proofing and a projection system which plays one film after another throughout the show. This is so much better than the admittedly bigger and more ambitious ‘Watch Me Move: The Animation Show’ at the Barbican in 2011 which was crowded, noisy and made viewing anything in its entirety very difficult to do.

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The individually painted gouache frames for ‘Quadrate’ (squares) 1934, are beautiful works of art in their own right and there is something about the simple materials; gouache paint on cheap animation paper (all though not a format I recognise) that is really attractive. And although it is really dull to forever go on about how long it takes to make animation, here the precision and physical quality of the hand-drawn and individually painted frames is kind of miraculous. Or maybe he had assistants.

At the end of the show there are examples of Fischinger’s graphical drawn sound experiments. Brilliant.

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Snowed in and can’t get to my studio in Brixton, so decided to upload these versions of a working drawing. The tape is for a stencil which will represent the yarn on a frame. I need to work on the sequencing and structure of the yarn as it wraps around what will be two frames. I’m thinking about the making of the warp chain on a warping mill, in preparation for threading onto a handloom for weaving.

The chain is wound in a particular order and formed into a chain as it is brought off the mill. It looks a bit like a strudel. This video gives you an idea. I’m interested in creating a notation and schematic that describes the elaborate and choreographed motion of the hand and the yarn.

The woodgrain paper is from Paperchase. It’s for doll’s houses, and they’ve stocked it for years.  It’s printed on very thin cheap paper and I’m addicted to it.