Archives for posts with tag: animation

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Forge for Derwent Pulse

This is Forge, an animation projection that was shown as part of Charles Monkhouse’s Derwent Pulse event at Darley Abbey, Derby on Friday night (31 October). It was made with my University of Derby colleagues Stuart Poynton and Marc Bosward. Rob and Phil at Derby QUAD provided the projection and the PA system.

We were approached by the Darley Abbey Society, after seeing our previous projection piece at Strutt’s North Mill Belper, to make a short animation work which was looped and projected onto the faces of the Grade I listed Long Mill (1782-89) and the adjoining West Mill (1819-21).

Stuart, Marc and I each made short animation sequences, with a soundtrack by Marc. The animation references the history of water, power, fire and rebuilding that characterises the history of the site. I used and abused letterpress printing I’ve made at the Univeristy of Derby’s printmaking studio. There is a certain joy in seeing little pieces of 30pt Univers lead type (with a x-height of about 6mm) transformed via ink, digits and light into 60 centimetre tall kinetic chaos bouncing across the walls of the mill.

Derwent Pulse
Darley Abbey Mills
Darley Abbey
Derby QUAD
Printmaking@derby
College of Arts University of Derby

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Pillar to Post (and back again)

We were back at Strutt’s North Mill Belper again last week (Thursday 15 May) for a Museums at Night event. This time animation was projected onto 10 of the monumental mill-stone grit piers in the mill’s basement.

The new animation was stripped back to blocks of light and colour with short sequences that responded to the blocky rectangular geometry of the pillars. The animation playback was synched to an audio track using Isadora software. So unlike the last light and sound show – where we had to manual synch the separate laptops – for Pillar to Post the installation’s five laptops and projectors responded to the audio independently of any input from the team (once it had been setup to go).

Visitors were able to walk between the pillars affecting the animation by breaking the projection light beam and changing the animation sequences by adding their own audio in the form of shouting, clapping and stamping.

From Pillar to Post (and back again), animation by Stuart Poynton, Shane Mellor and Tim Shore with sound by Marc Bosward.

Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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Rebirth: light and sound show at Strutt’s North Mill Belper

So the event on Saturday 29 March went well. Sarah (mill manager) and Ruth (engagement officer) reckoned we had about 120 visitors for the show.

While Stuart set up the laptops I measured and cut out film to stick to the windowpanes of the six windows, each window had six panes, so we had to measure, cut and stick 36 sheets. Meanwhile Stuart discovered that the laptops went to sleep after five minutes and we didn’t have administrator rights to cancel the sleep mode.

Still it all worked well. We staggered the startup of each laptop by the time it physically took to get each one going. So a relaxed synchronisation and a kind off delayed playback coupled with running or crawling (in my case) to each laptop to tap its trackpad to ward off sleep. Not live but certainly performative animation happened behind the scenes and largely out of view of the audience.

We are reworking the animation and sequencing for the North Mill’s ‘Museums at Night’ event on May 15. We will project the animation onto eight of the 26 monumental stone piers – all that is left of Jedediah Strutt’s first mill (1786) that burnt down in 1803 – that form the foundation of the ‘new’ mill built in 1804.

More information about Culture24’s national Museums at Night festival here and Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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Strutt’s North Mill Belper

We want to reference some of the elemental forces that helped shape the mill including fire, water and iron. Strutt’s North Mill was built in 1804 and is one of the oldest surviving examples of an industrialised, iron framed ‘fire proof’ building. The first mill burnt down.

I’ve used mono prints made during the printing of the first card template (below). I was thinking of iron being cast and the firey furnace and also some of the fantastic footage used in ‘The Big Melt – How Steel Made Us Hard‘ (Martin Wallace and Jarvis Cocker).

This will form part of a larger work made with Stuart Poynton and Marc Bosward (sound). It will be projected onto the windows of Strutt’s North Mill Belper this weekend (7pm on Saturday 29 March).

Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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More animation for Strutt’s North Mill Belper

I’m making very short animation sequences using a convoluted, complex (relatively) slow process.

Method
The gif (top) is the result of drawing the animation in Illustrator, then laser cutting the individual frames from corrugated card, followed by relief printing the frame matrix with black ink onto 40gsm newsprint. When the ink is dry the sheet is cut into individual frames that are then scanned and photoshoped before assembly and timing in AfterEffects.

The process needs refining. I like the finished result but it’s a bit too ordered or regular. I was hoping for more of the unexpected and that the various format changes and translations would add a greater range of ‘mistakes’ or random events into the workflow.

As I make these sequences I’m thinking about slow animation that is beyond the control of the animator and that through an engagement with a range of machine processes (both analogue and digital) I can attempt to foreground both animation’s craft legacy and its constructed nature. A project to make animation visible again.

Maybe animation is sited in the frame after all and not in the gap between frames?

My sequences will form part of a larger work made with Stuart Poynton and Marc Bosward (sound). It will be projected onto the windows of Strutt’s North Mill Belper this weekend (7pm on Saturday 29 March).

Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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Sample images and treatments for ‘Rebirth’ a light and sound projection made with Stuart Poynton and Marc Bosward. A looped animation made from a patchwork of short animation sequences will be projected onto the windows of the first floor and basement of Strutt’s North Mill Belper as part of the celebrations to mark the museum’s Summer Opening event.

The animation will be projected from inside the museum onto six windows that will be covered with a translucent film. A lot of animation to make and stitch together before the event on Saturday 29 March 2014 (7pm).

Strutt’s North Mill Belper

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Happy accidents in translation

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Carbon (1′, 2001, RCA)

Carbon, a one minute film I made at the RCA in 2001, is being shown in ’Kinetic Typography’, part of the  #SEENINTHEDEEN exhibition at Peacock Visual Arts, Aberdeen.

The exhibition runs from 22 November to 21 December 2013. More information at Peacock Visual Arts.

Peacock Visual Arts
21 Castle Street
Aberdeen AB11 5BQ
Scotland, United Kingdom
01224 639539

Gallery Opening Hours
Tuesday to Saturday 9.30am to 5.30pm

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Towser Zine Archive at Uncanny Valley
Hebden Bridge Arts Festival 2013
24th – 26th June

My artists’ book, Corpus, has been selected for inclusion in the Towser Zine Archive, curated by Alice Bradshaw and Vanessa Haley. The Archive features in Uncanny Valley at the Hebden Bridge Arts Festival 2013. The Archive was first exhibited at last year’s Holmfirth Arts Festival (2012) when artists were asked to respond to the Luddite Bicentenary theme of that year’s festival.

Uncanny Valley is an animation festival organised by Magpie Cinema. It makes an exciting connection between artists’ books, zines and animation via the shared legacy of print culture which includes, comic strip, illustration technique (like collage, montage and bricolage) and the sequential mechanical imagery of the Zoetrope.

Corpus is a hand-made artists’ book that commemorates the 17 West Yorkshire Luddites executed at York Castle in January 1813 at the height of the Luddite Uprising of 1812/1813.

Corpus, 26 page concertina fold (198 x 90 mm), white cartridge paper, cardboard sleeve, acetone transfer text.

Went to the Oskar Fischinger exhibition at EYE, Amsterdam a couple of weeks ago. EYE Film Institute Netherlands opened in 2012, it is another example of wonky iconic architecture (think gherkin, cheesegrater, walkie-talkie, shard) and it’s a very short ferry ride from the central station, across the IJ to Amsterdam-Noord.

Amsterdam EYE
The exhibition – Oskar Fischinger 1900 – 1967: Experiments in Cinematic Abstraction – is organised by EYE Filmmuseum and Center for Visual Music and surveys Fischinger’s work and career in Europe and America. The animation work is really well installed with large screens in properly dark rooms, sound proofing and a projection system which plays one film after another throughout the show. This is so much better than the admittedly bigger and more ambitious ‘Watch Me Move: The Animation Show’ at the Barbican in 2011 which was crowded, noisy and made viewing anything in its entirety very difficult to do.

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The individually painted gouache frames for ‘Quadrate’ (squares) 1934, are beautiful works of art in their own right and there is something about the simple materials; gouache paint on cheap animation paper (all though not a format I recognise) that is really attractive. And although it is really dull to forever go on about how long it takes to make animation, here the precision and physical quality of the hand-drawn and individually painted frames is kind of miraculous. Or maybe he had assistants.

At the end of the show there are examples of Fischinger’s graphical drawn sound experiments. Brilliant.

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